Military Shooting Kills 21-Year-Old Marine

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In early April of this year, tragedy struck a young Marine stationed in Camp LeJeune, North Carolina. Lance Corporal Mark Boterf was stationed on watch at the camp’s main gate when he was killed by a single gunshot.

Boterf was loved by many and was described as “a cheerful person with a giving heart.” His twin brother elaborated, stating that his brother “would do anything for anyone, no matter what it was, if you needed it, he’d do it for you.” Perhaps ironically, Boterf went to great lengths to achieve the position that ultimately led to his early passing: he’d recently underwent surgery to correct a hernia, then worked hard to recover his strength so that he was able to pass the Marine Corp’s stringent physical examination requirements.

While national news media covers the sad event of Boterf’s death, the other half of the story has received far less attention: who shot Boterf, what were the circumstances of the shooting and will a court martial occur?

All that is known for sure at the present time is that the shooter is in custody and that his name has not yet been released, pending an investigation. Though there is no indication that the shooting was intentional, tensions are high following the April 2 shooting at Fort Hood that resulted in four deaths, as well as the 2009 Fort Hood shooting that resulted in 13 deaths.

What is known is that the military’s investigation will be exhaustive and that it can be expected that the accused will need legal help: Legal maneuvering continues following the recent Fort Hoot shooting, and trial and preparation for trial continued for years following the 2009 Fort Hood shooting. Whatever the circumstances of the Camp LeJeune shooting, the shooter will likely need an experienced and knowledgeable legal advocate.

Denver Court Martial Attorney Ryan Coward of CourtMarialLaw.com served as trial defense counsel in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting case and can answer any questions you may have regarding a summary court martial, special court martial or general court martial. To contact Ryan Coward for a no-charge consultation, call 303-567-7981.

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