Love Triangle Results in Murder on Air Base

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A love triangle leading to a murder sounds like something out of a soap opera.  Unfortunately, reality is sometimes stranger than fiction and this is exactly what occurred between military members stationed in Germany.  

Airman Staff Sergeant Sean Oliver admitted to killing Petty Officer 2nd Class Dmitry Chepusov.  Oliver, Chepusov and Army Specialist Cody A. Kramer all worked together at the American Forces Network- Europe office on the Ramstein Air Base in Germany.  It seems that Chepusov and his wife, Alejandra Zolezzi, were having marital problems and had decided to get divorced.  Chepusov had begun seeing other women and Zolezzi began seeing Oliver.  At some point, Chepusov threatened to expose the relationship between Oliver and Zolezzi, which would cause Zolezzi to be sent back to the United States and negatively affect Oliver’s career.

Oliver admitted to killing Chepusov at Airman Thomas Skinkle’s home.  The two were in the kitchen when Oliver strangled Chepusov to death.  Skinkle was passed out drunk but Kramer and another military member were at the house when the murder was taking place.  

It seems from the evidence that Oliver, Zolezzi and Kramer may have conspired to kill Chepusov during their meeting at a restaurant three days before the murder.  Military authorities are trying to ascertain whether Kramer was involved.  In fact, Oliver’s admission became known at Kramer’s Article 32 proceeding.  An Article 32 is similar to a civilian grand jury hearing and is used to determine if someone should be subject to court martial.   Some critical forensic evidence was unavailable at the time of the Article 32 and therefore cannot be considered in deciding whether Kramer should face a court martial. 

Court martial law is unlike any other area.  Those subject to a court martial need the representation of an attorney that is experienced in the field.  If you are facing military charges, contact Elkus, Sisson & Rosenstein at (303)567-7981 for a free consultation. 

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