Fort Carson Lt. Colonel Faces Court-Martial for Viewing Child Porn on Base in Afghanistan

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What is at stake when a member of the armed forces faces a court-martial?

A Lt. Col. from the 4th Infantry Division’s headquarters battalion at Fort Carson, Colorado, is facing a court-martial. The charges involve allegations that he viewed child pornography on a government computer while serving in Afghanistan in 2013.

The defendant is also charged with failing to obey orders, since all U.S. troops in Afghanistan are specifically forbidden, under U.S. Central Command’s General Order No. 1, from engaging in any activities deemed offensive in Islamic nations. These practices include possessing or viewing pornography and consuming alcoholic beverages.

The defendant, who has spent 30 years in the Army and is now a reservist, has been recalled to active duty to face the child pornography charges.  He is accused of searching for child erotica and child pornography and attempting to view child pornography on a government computer.

According to court papers, during three weeks beginning in September 2013, the defendant used an airbase computer in southwestern Afghanistan for several  suspicious internet searches , including some for Russian websites, and one that included a search for “very young teen undressed.” 

The defendant is the highest-ranking officer in Fort Carson to face a court-martial in the past 10 years. He has spent his career in support and supply activities and has earned the Meritorious Service Medal for assignments overseas, including in Afghanistan and Iraq. Because of his extended service, he receives an income of more than $8700 a month, an amount near the top of the Army pay scale.

There is a great deal at stake for any member of the armed forces facing a court-martial. If found guilty of charges, the defendant may be required to serve time in jail, be dishonorably discharged, and suffer the loss of all pay and privileges attendant upon being a Lt. Colonel  in the U. S. Army.

If you are a member of the armed forces who has been charged with a crime, please get in touch with one of our skilled attorneys at Court Martial Law. All of lawyers are experienced in military administrative actions and court martial defense.  Located in Denver, Colorado, we service military clients all over the world and can be reached at 719.247.3111.

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