What Are Your Rights When You’ve Been Accused of a Crime in the Military?

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It goes without saying that being considered as a suspect or charged with a crime can result in some pretty serious consequences. The way in which you handle things in the here and now can make a huge impact on what will happen in the future. This is why it’s so important to understand what your rights are as a military member and to seek the counsel of a military lawyer who can walk you through each step of the process and help to achieve the best outcome for you. 

Know Your Rights

It’s important that you assert your rights under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) should you find yourself in such a situation. If you fail to do so, you may experience irreparable harm. As per Article 31b of the UCMJ, you have the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney. 

You are afforded these two rights for good reason. It’s important that you invoke your right to remain silent. Rather than speak to military or civilian law enforcement personnel – or anyone else for that matter – seek to speak with a knowledgeable and experienced military criminal defense attorney. 

Bear in mind however that it’s not enough to simply stay quiet. You must clearly invoke your right to remain silent by making a statement to the effect of “I want my attorney now.” It is not enough to make a statement such as “I think I want an attorney” or “I think I need an attorney.” It’s best to remain quiet and speak as little as possible so as not to accidentally say something that could be held against you. 

Also be sure that you do not ask any questions after invoke your rights, as it could be consider a waiver of them. 

Searches and Interrogations

It’s also important to know your other rights, such as your right to refuse to consent to a warrantless search or to one in which there is no probable cause. Additionally, you have the right to terminate an interrogation, to consult with an attorney, and/or to have an attorney with you while you are being questioned. 

Keep in mind that a state or federal criminal conviction can seriously impact your military status, resulting in a dishonorable discharge. This is why it’s so important that you seek a qualified military criminal defense attorney who knows how to fight these charges for you. 

The Court-Martial Law Division of Aviso Law LLC Helps Military Members in Colorado Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

The U.S. Government has an interest in obtaining a conviction as soon as possible, as it does not wish to gain negative publicity about one of its service members. That is why it is so important to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced military attorney as soon as possible.

If you are a military service member (active or reserve) and have been charged with a crime under the UCMJ, the Court-Martial Law Division of Aviso Law LLC can help. We proudly serve our military members, who sacrifice so much for our country. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

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